Global Performance Studies announces the addition of two new co-editors

Kevin BrownAll News, News from PSi, Publications

Committed to collaborative and activist scholarship, Global Performance Studies is proud to announce that we are expanding our editorial team to include two new co-editors: Dr. Nesreen Hussein and Dr. Felipe Cervera. GPS will now be co-edited between them, joining founding editor Dr. Kevin Brown. 

Dr. Nesreen N. Hussein (BFA, MRes, PGCHE, AFHEA, PhD) is an artist, scholar and Lecturer in Contemporary Theatre at Middlesex University, London. Her current research focuses on the intersections of performance, politics, and activism, in relation to issues of identity, agency and belonging. In 2011, she was awarded the Helsinki Essay Prize and the New Scholars’ Prize from the International Federation for Theatre Research (IFTR). She is the co-founder of ‘Politicised Artistic Practices: An Interdisciplinary Research Initiative’. Her current artistic practice is centred around exploring identity, mobility, belonging, and the city.

Dr. Felipe Cervera (PhD, MA; Mexico City, 1984) is a theatre maker, scholar, and Lecturer in Theatre at LASALLE College of the Arts in Singapore. His research interests are the interplays between performance, science, and technology as well as collaborative academia (teaching and research).  His work has been published in Theatre, Dance, & Performance Training, Global Performance Studies, Text & Performance Quarterly, Theatre Research International, Performance Research, and Performance Philosophy, among others. He is the co-founder of After Performance Working Group. He is based in Singapore since 2012, where he also sustains a regular practice as a director and performance maker. 

Global Performance Studies is a peer reviewed online academic journal sponsored by Performance Studies international (PSi). Our goal is to provide a resource to scholars and artists who are seeking to publish both traditional articles as well cross-platform, multi-media content that pushes the boundaries of what we think an academic journal can be. We are also interested in finding ways the journal can serve a truly global audience of performance studies scholars and artists.