[cs_content][cs_section bg_color=”#d75c37″ parallax=”false” separator_top_type=”none” separator_top_height=”50px” separator_top_inset=”0px” separator_top_angle_point=”50″ separator_bottom_type=”none” separator_bottom_height=”50px” separator_bottom_inset=”0px” separator_bottom_angle_point=”50″ _label=”Header WG” style=”margin: 0px;padding: 45px 0px;”][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” _label=”Row 1″ style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”1/1″ type=”1/1″ style=”padding: 0px;”][cs_text class=”cs-ta-left”]

WORKING GROUPS

PSi Working Groups bring together individual researchers to exchange ideas about shared topics of interest. Working groups meet during the yearly conferences, and sometimes also organize additional conferences or other events in between the conferences. (Note: Working Groups need to meet at least every other year at a PSi conference in order to be considered an active PSi group.)

If you would like to propose a working group, please contact Jennifer Nikolai.

[/cs_text][/cs_column][/cs_row][/cs_section][cs_section parallax=”false” separator_top_type=”none” separator_top_height=”50px” separator_top_inset=”0px” separator_top_angle_point=”50″ separator_bottom_type=”none” separator_bottom_height=”50px” separator_bottom_inset=”0px” separator_bottom_angle_point=”50″ _label=”Section 3″ style=”margin: 0px;padding: 45px 0px;”][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” _label=”Copy of Row 1″ style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”1/3″ type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_feature_box title=”AFTER DWIGHT CONQUERGOOD” title_color=”” text_color=”” graphic=”image” graphic_size=”60px” graphic_shape=”square” graphic_color=”#ffffff” graphic_bg_color=”#2ecc71″ align_h=”center” align_v=”top” side_graphic_spacing=”20px” max_width=”none” graphic_image=”” graphic_image_alt_text=””][/x_feature_box][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”2/3″ type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_tab_nav type=”four-up” float=”top”][x_tab_nav_item title=”about” active=”true”][x_tab_nav_item title=”intention” active=”false”][x_tab_nav_item title=”events” active=”false”][x_tab_nav_item title=”contact” active=”false”][/x_tab_nav][x_tabs][x_tab active=”true”]This group aims to support a critical praxis of socially engaged performance scholars. This praxis, to borrow Conquergood’s words, “struggles to open the space between analysis and action”. The group seeks to explore, stimulate and develop its members’ work through the sharing of practice, writing, ethical debate, collaborative research and embodied learning.
[/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]In 2016, PSi’s Dwight Conquergood Award (DCA) was in its 10th year. What does it mean to work “in the spirit of Dwight Conquergood”? This phrase shapes the criteria for how the Dwight Conquergood awardees are selected. But what is that ‘spirit’ exactly, and what critical, historical, mnemonic, affective and ethical landscapes and lineages coalesce to contour it? This working group provides a platform for exchange amongst DCA Laureates and other interested PSi members to explore ways of working together ‘after Dwight Conquergood’. The work of such scholars may be socially motivated, or take as its focus socially engaged theatre practices. However, it may also combine action and analysis through modes of ethnography, storytelling or performance practice that reflect a socially engaged methodology. We hope to provide mutual support in the areas we have in common: working with ‘disenfranchised communities’, and working across the disciplinary structures of performance and ethnography.
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Working Group Call for Papers

‘After Dwight Conquergood: Performance and Critical Social Praxis’

PSi#25 – July 4-7 2019 – Calgary

The ‘After Dwight Conquergood’ working group exists to support a critical praxis of socially engaged performance scholars. This praxis, to borrow Conquergood’s words, “struggles to open the space between analysis and action” (2002: 145). The work of such scholars may be socially motivated, or take as its focus socially engaged theatre practices. It may also combine action and analysis through modes of ethnography, storytelling or performance practice that reflect a socially engaged methodology.

At PSi#25 2019 in Calgary, we will be holding a working group session (in person and via Skype/email), to share our experiences of negotiating the opportunities and difficulties of working in these ways.

We invite reflections on the idea of ‘para-academia’ and the ‘para-academic’, as a possible way of thinking through participants’ concerns, practices and hopes. This term tests the affordances of the conference’s thematic ‘elasticity’. If elasticity implies a stretching of and eventual return to a prior state or status quo, how might ‘para’ prefix an alternative relation to the norms of academic work? If elasticity implies the resilience of actors, institutions or processes to transform and yet remain intact, do ‘para-academics’ perform resilience, or instead encounter snapping points? To what extent is a para-academic relation to institutions sustainable? What counter-effects does it produce, and are these inclusive and/or lasting? Who can identify as a ‘para-academic’?

Could para-academia be like paradox(a), and provide dialogic questions or a counter-narrative? Could it be like parapluie (umbrella) and form shelter for going ‘against the flow’, under which alternative practices can huddle together? Can we act as a parasite and recuperate what we need from institutions? Or do they (and we) sometimes act parasitically on other creative practices?

We also take this opportunity to debate the name of the working group and its current association with the late US researcher Dwight Conquergood. The working group was founded in the 10th year of PSi’s Dwight Conquergood Award to reflect on the terms of that award and Conquergood’s legacy in performance studies. Is this affiliation productive – might we consider Conquergood as a para-academic, for example – or does it imply unhelpful hegemonies in centering a (US, white, male) researcher in our work?

We invite you to share a 500 word description of an experience or question you would like to discuss with the group, to be circulated in advance. The goal is to reflect together on the concrete challenges (and successes) we face, and how to think through these critically in moving forward.

Please send your documents and any relevant images to the working group co-convenors by 30th April 2019:

Prof Jazmin Badong Llana    jazmin.llana@dlsu.edu.ph

Dr Matt Yoxall               mattyoxall@yahoo.com

Dr Ella Parry-Davies             ella.parry-davies@cssd.ac.uk

Participants can be present on Skype during the working group meeting, if not in person. If this is impossible, they can reflect on other participants’ contributions via email to be circulated in advance of the meeting.

[/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]Matt Yoxall (Chiang Mai University)
Jazmin Badong Llana (De La Salle University, Manila)
Ella Parry-Davies (King’s College London & National University of Singapore) [/x_tab][/x_tabs][/cs_column][/cs_row][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”rgb(195, 215, 223)” _label=”Copy of Row 1″ style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”1/3″ type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_feature_box title=”COMMUNITY PERFORMANCE” title_color=”” text_color=”” graphic=”image” graphic_size=”60px” graphic_shape=”square” graphic_color=”#ffffff” graphic_bg_color=”#2ecc71″ align_h=”center” align_v=”top” side_graphic_spacing=”20px” max_width=”none” graphic_image=”” graphic_image_alt_text=””][/x_feature_box][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”2/3″ type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_tab_nav type=”three-up” float=”top”][x_tab_nav_item title=”about” active=”true”][x_tab_nav_item title=”events” active=”false”][x_tab_nav_item title=”contact” active=”false”][/x_tab_nav][x_tabs][x_tab active=”true”]This group offers a meet-up and networking meeting at PSi conferences, for people interested in and engaged in community performance, community-based theatre, theatre for social change – we use a wide open definition, and mainly understand ourselves as a hosting space.
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Community Performance Working Group will hold a networking session on July 5, 2018, during PSi#24 conference in Daegu, South Korea. Kanta Kochhar-Lindgren will be the host. All are welcome, introduce yourself, meet others, and enjoy each other’s company.

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Petra Kuppers, (University of Michigan), chair Community Performance working group.

[/x_tab][/x_tabs][/cs_column][/cs_row][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” _label=”Copy of Copy of Row 1″ style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”1/3″ type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_feature_box title=”PERFORMANCE AND PHILOSOPHY” title_color=”” text_color=”” graphic=”image” graphic_size=”60px” graphic_shape=”square” graphic_color=”#ffffff” graphic_bg_color=”#2ecc71″ align_h=”center” align_v=”top” side_graphic_spacing=”20px” max_width=”none” graphic_image=”” graphic_image_alt_text=””][/x_feature_box][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”2/3″ type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_tab_nav type=”four-up” float=”top”][x_tab_nav_item title=”about” active=”true”][x_tab_nav_item title=”intention” active=”false”][x_tab_nav_item title=”events” active=”false”][x_tab_nav_item title=”contact” active=”false”][/x_tab_nav][x_tabs][x_tab active=”true”]Founded by Laura Cull in 2008, the PSi Performance and Philosophy Group aims to encourage debate and collaboration between PSi members who have in common their engagement in philosophy as it intersects with performance. [/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]The membership is made up of international practitioners, independent scholars, postgraduates, emerging scholars and established figures – all of whom engage with the ideas of a diverse range of philosophers including: Alain Badiou, Giorgio Agamben, Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Ranciere, François Laruelle, Luce Irigaray, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Emmanuel Levinas, Jacques Derrida, Jean-François Lyotard and Michel Foucault. But for the most part, this research wants to move beyond the mere application of philosophy to performance and to explore the philosophical dimensions of performance alongside the performative dimensions of philosophy.

The working group coordinates research events and publications that allow members to examine connections between performance and philosophy. Members research the nature of the relationship between philosophy and performance in a variety of contexts, such as: the use of philosophy as a methodology in Performance Studies; performance theory and practices exploring philosophical themes; philosophers’ writings on the theatre and performance; dramatic texts by philosophers.

Members pursue research questions including, but not limited to, the following:
How might philosophy and performance relate? To what extent might performance be understood as that which puts philosophy into practice?
What are the benefits and risks of the translocation of concepts from philosophy into the study of performance? What are the values and problems of configuring an individual philosophers’ work as a methodology for the study of performance: the Deleuzian, Derridean, Foucauldian etc.? •
Can philosophy be understood as performance? Can performance be understood to be doing philosophical work?
A special issue of the journal Performance Research, “On Philosophy and Participation” was commissioned following the 2009 interim conference in Aberystwyth and was published by Routledge in December 2011.
Documentation of the groups contributions to PSi 15 in Zagreb, PSi 16 in Toronto, PSi 17 in Utrecht can be found on the working group’s own website.

As a member you will receive a regular mailing list information on the group’s forthcoming activities. You will also be invited to join the group’s website, which includes a members database.[/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]The working group tends to meet twice a year: once at the events organised by the group at the annual PSi conference and again at an interim conference specifically dedicated to performance & philosophy. So far, there have been 4 interim conferences:

– How Performance Thinks in London in April 2012
– Actor, Performer, Citizen in Helsinki in April 2011
– Performance & Philosophy in Berlin in April 2010
– Making and Thinking in Aberystwyth in January 2009

Performance Philosophy will run an open working group at PSi #22 Performance Climates in Melbourne on 5 July 2016.

Based on previous years, the working group will take the format of a brief (5-7 minute) informal intervention that outlines your approach or interest in performance philosophy with time for questions and discussion. The talk can be either theoretical or offer a practical provocation.

The group aims to provide a chance for performance scholars and performance philosophers working within different philosophical traditions to meet and make connections in their research prior to the formal opening of the conference. Participants will include, among others, Performance Philosophy co-conveners Theron Schmidt (in person) and Will Daddario (via Skype).
[/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]If you would like to join the working group, please contact the Chair, Will Daddario.

> Website Performance and Philosophy Working Group
> Performance Research, “On Philosophy and Participation[/x_tab][/x_tabs][/cs_column][/cs_row][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”rgb(195, 215, 223)” _label=”Copy of Row 1″ style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”1/3″ type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_feature_box title=”DRAMATURGY & PERFORMANCE” title_color=”” text_color=”” graphic=”image” graphic_size=”60px” graphic_shape=”square” graphic_color=”#ffffff” graphic_bg_color=”#2ecc71″ align_h=”center” align_v=”top” side_graphic_spacing=”20px” max_width=”none” graphic_image=”” graphic_image_alt_text=””][/x_feature_box][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”2/3″ type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_tab_nav type=”four-up” float=”top”][x_tab_nav_item title=”about” active=”true”][x_tab_nav_item title=”intention” active=”false”][x_tab_nav_item title=”events” active=”false”][x_tab_nav_item title=”contact” active=”false”][/x_tab_nav][x_tabs][x_tab active=”true”]Dramaturgy and Performance Studies Working Group will broadly consider the particular situation of dramaturgy in relation to performance studies. It will open new perspectives on dramaturgy that are not considered in theatre studies contexts nor in cognate fields of research such as literary studies. Meanwhile, it will also consider how the discipline of performance studies has developed alongside and in connection with the revived interest in contemporary dramaturgical practices.
Starting our inquiries are the questions:
What are the ideas and practices connecting performance studies and dramaturgy?
Is performance studies dramaturgical and how does dramaturgy (mis)perform in applying concepts and practices essayed within the performance studies paradigm?[/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]

The PSi working group on Dramaturgy and Performance will engage three broad subjects over the coming years: How we respond to the ways in which new research paradigms have expanded dramaturgy; the forms of emergent and embodied thinking that dramaturgical awareness facilitates; and the ethical dimensions of the choices that dramaturgy enables.

The working group is inclusive; when convening at a PSi conference, an open call for participation will be distributed well in advance.  This call will include a subset of discussion themes and an invitation to submit discussion prompts in the form of 1-page responses to a series of open-ended questions. The working group sessions are generally organized as a combination of 2-3 minute presentations, facilitated work in smaller groups, and feed-back/discussion in a larger group.

Please direct questions regarding this group to the convenor Pil Hansen at pil.hansen@ucalgary.ca

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Call for Participation: PSi25 Working Group on Dramaturgy and Performance, 2019

We invite artists and scholars attending the PSi conference in 2019 to participate in our open Working Group meeting. This working group is engaging three broad subjects over a series of years: how we respond to the ways in which new research paradigms have expanded dramaturgy; the forms of emergent and embodied thinking that dramaturgical awareness facilitates; and the ethical dimensions of the choices that dramaturgy enables.

This year the group will focus on the concept of dramaturgical awareness. In addition to an open conversation about what this mode of awareness might constitute, we are interested in discussing the ways in which evolving praxes, forms of collaboration, research paradigms, and enviro-political changes expand the aspects of performance that are dramaturged or can be usefully regarded as dramaturgies. Might the types of awareness that these expanded dramaturgies bring about increase agency or decrease constraints? Might they sometimes consolidate in principles and norms and to what effect? In our meeting, we will facilitate discussion in rotating groups around themes and problems drawn from participants’ responses to these questions. Our objective is to map positions, generate possible answers, and articulate new questions.

If you would like to participate in the working group at PSi25, then please consider submitting discussion prompts and/or reflections in response to the theme of “dramaturgical awareness” and the associated questions described above. Your written response should be a maximum of 500 words in length and submitted to pil.hansen@ucalgary.ca by June 24, 2019 (include “DRAMATUGY WG” in your subject line). All contributors of written responses will be invited to offer a brief summary of their prompt/reflection at the beginning of our session.

Warm regards,

Pil Hansen (Dramaturgy and Performance working group Chair and Convenor)

Bruce Barton (Dramaturgy and Performance working group Co-Convenor, 2019)

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If you would like to know more about the Dramaturgy & Performance Working Group, please contact the chair Pil Hansen.

[/x_tab][/x_tabs][/cs_column][/cs_row][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” _label=”Copy of Row 1″ style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”1/3″ type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_feature_box title=”PERFORMANCE IN HISTORICAL PARADIGMS” title_color=”” text_color=”” graphic=”image” graphic_size=”60px” graphic_shape=”square” graphic_color=”#ffffff” graphic_bg_color=”#2ecc71″ align_h=”center” align_v=”top” side_graphic_spacing=”20px” max_width=”none” graphic_image=”” graphic_image_alt_text=””][/x_feature_box][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”2/3″ type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_tab_nav type=”four-up” float=”top”][x_tab_nav_item title=”about” active=”true”][x_tab_nav_item title=”intention” active=”false”][x_tab_nav_item title=”events” active=”false”][x_tab_nav_item title=”contact” active=”false”][/x_tab_nav][x_tabs][x_tab active=”true”]The Performance in Historical Paradigms Working Group provides a dynamic forum for the discussion of performance studies methodologies for those who engage with multiple (inter)disciplinary paradigms and use performance theory to think historically, or think historically about performance.  
[/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]Questions we seek to address include:

  • Where does the merging of history and performance studies currently occur most productively, and where is it less so?
  • Are there, or should there be, any limits to the use of performance theory in historical inquiry?
  • What is the current state of scholarship in this “in between” space?
    And how might that “in between” state change in the future?
  • How might performance studies expand, change, or challenge the field of history—and vice versa?
  • How can the methods, theoretical influences, and other disciplinary preoccupations of Performance Studies apply to the study of the past?
  • How do different research methodologies enable a historical perspective and what are their drawbacks?
  • What constitutes evidence in the intersection of performance studies and history?
  • How do historically-oriented scholars subject evidence of past performance to rigorous critique?
  • How does ephemerality, elusiveness, or transience of performance constitute problems of historical research, how do they need to be accounted for, and what are the options?

We welcome proposals to our annual workshops at the PSi conference.[/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]

The Performance in Historical Paradigms Working Group provides a dynamic forum for the discussion of performance studies methodologies for those who engage with multiple (inter)disciplinary paradigms and use performance theory to think historically, or think historically about performance. This year we invite select scholars and artists to participate in our panels, shifts, and roundtable discussion. Papers and performances should be no longer than 20 minutes in length, and engage with the general working group focus on the intersections between performance studies and history. Questions we address include:

  • How might performance studies expand, change, or challenge the field of history — and vice versa?
  • Where does the merging of history and performance studies currently occur most productively?  Are there, or should there be, any limits to the use of performance theory in historical inquiry?
  • How can the methods, theoretical influences, and other disciplinary preoccupations of performance studies apply to the study of the past?
  • How do different research methodologies enable a historical perspective and what are their drawbacks?
  • What constitutes evidence at the intersection of performance studies and history?

The focus of the PSi 25 Elasticity conference is particularly potent for the critical investigation of the intersections of performance studies and history. In our working group, we will examine the social, political, and artistic themes of elasticity, fluidity, immigration, forced migration, assimilation, disidentification, as well as the adaptability, flexibility, and resilience of (un)desired bodies—and the limits thereof—through the interdisciplinary lens of performance studies and historiography.

We invite papers and/or performances that engage with the following questions:

+ The (Non)Elasticity of Hegemonic Narratives

  • What are the ways in which the elasticity of historical narratives can be used to counter hegemonic constructions?
  • What genealogical legacies determine the policies and practices of dominant social groups and governmental institutions that attempt to construe and homogenize local identities? How do performances expose or contest the abuse of such genealogical legacies?
  • In what ways do historical narratives and legacies substantiate forms of resistance and ruptures?
  • The use of historical evidence, including archival records, documents, and video footage, has become increasingly popular in recent performances. Such historical traces promise authenticity and accuracy in the purportedly fictitious world of the performance. What are the structures of feeling in contemporary society and scholarship that might cause such anxiety over desire for an authentic experience of the historical past?

+ Elastical Theories

  • The emergence of influential critical frameworks such as Marxism, postcolonialism, decoloniality, gender and queer studies, critical indigenous studies—theories developed for the empowerment of marginalized communities and transient subcultures—led to an unprecedented intertwine between scholarship and activism. How does the elasticity of such discursive and analytical practices allow scholars and practitioners to reimagine their work outside of the conventional binary of theory and praxis?
  • If the discursive elasticity of the field of performance studies is—in part—a result of the increased versatility and fluidity of contemporary activism and practice, then—conversely—what are the ways in which theory can extend and animate the artistic and activist imagination?
  • How do dispersed digitalized practices of resistance allow for a more elastic political and social activism? How does the virtual appearance of strength and empowerment impact real-life potency?
  • Until recently, history and historiography have been considered some of the least “elastic” disciplines relying on the rigid materiality of historical records. Various interdisciplinary fields, often under the umbrella of performance studies, have contested this rigidity in intriguing ways. In what ways can the historiography of theatre and live performance allow for the emergence of historical thinking and consciousness that is more elastic?

+ Elasticity as the Ontological Condition of Migration and Exile

  • If elasticity is perforce the ontological condition of the migrant, how can it become a creative, productive force under these always already stretched and overextended circumstances? How can we make sense of “elasticity” in the context of migration? Is it a forced and necessary flexibility, the agential choice to continuously stretch the human experience, or the non-agential ‘being stretched’ as a condition of the migrant?
  • What are the quotidian experiences and embodied practices of migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers and how do they shape and are—in turn—shaped by their transactions with the nation-state?
  • How do intersectional identifications (e.g. race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, class) and the performance of identities in diaspora construe different immigrant experiences?
  • How do the master narratives of globalization and transnationalization affect local immigrant communities?
  • What are the political and aesthetic interventions to the current refugee crisis undertaken by artists, scholars, human rights activists, and others? Are there historical antecedents that might inform current activism?
  • What are the ideological and material conditions of the reception of displaced persons—from performances of hospitality to the spatial practices of the carceral state such refugee camps and detention centers?
  • How do technology and the cyberspace construe (and transform) activism and performances of resistance?
  • What theoretical and methodological contributions might the nexus of history and performance studies offer to the ongoing debate on immigration?

To apply, please submit paper or performance abstracts directly to the working group conveners: Dominika Laster dominika.laster@gmail.com and Aniko Szucs aszucs@haverford.edu by January 15, 2019.  Proposals should include your name, institutional affiliation, e-mail address, phone number, technical requirements for your presentation (PC, projector, DVD player, internet access), a title and 250-word abstract, as well as a 150-word bio.

[/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]The chairs of the Performance in Historical Paradigms Working Group are Aniko Szucs (NYU) and Dominika Laster (University of New Mexico).[/x_tab][/x_tabs][/cs_column][/cs_row][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”rgb(195, 215, 223)” _label=”Row 2″ style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”1/3″ type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_feature_box title=”ARTISTIC RESEARCH” title_color=”” text_color=”” graphic=”image” graphic_size=”60px” graphic_shape=”square” graphic_color=”#ffffff” graphic_bg_color=”#2ecc71″ align_h=”center” align_v=”top” side_graphic_spacing=”20px” max_width=”none” graphic_image=”” graphic_image_alt_text=””][/x_feature_box][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”2/3″ type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_tab_nav type=”four-up” float=”top”][x_tab_nav_item title=”about” active=”true”][x_tab_nav_item title=”intention” active=”false”][x_tab_nav_item title=”events” active=”false”][x_tab_nav_item title=”contact” active=”false”][/x_tab_nav][x_tabs][x_tab active=”true”]A primary concern of the Artistic Research Working Group (ARWG) is to encourage and expand artist participation on the ground in PSi and to expand and integrate a spectrum of discourse strategies into the PSi environment. During several years now ARWG has hosted a space and situation called the Porous Studio during the annual conference in order to invite, include, and engage artists from the neighboring region in addition to members of the Working Group to share their artistic research processes.[/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]Among Artistic Research’s primary characteristics is its potential to expand traditional epistemological frameworks for the discovery, creation, and dissemination of knowledge and experience. Artistic Research provides rich and robust contexts for investigations of both tangible events and the affective ambience that they generate. Thus the Porous Studio is designed to realize a productive laboratory of experimentation at the permeable borders of theory, philosophy, pedagogy, practice and research—one that underscores the notion of annual continuity and the practical/symbolic significance of studio/site/process at the PSi conferences. We are a constantly mutating social network of artists, which over successive years maps itself onto sites in different cities, countries and continents.Porousness thus indicates both an opening of the traditionally private domain of the artist’s studio to the public nature of performance research and practice, and a determination to engage with local artist-researchers to explore the specificities of performance in the region.[/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]

ARWG is going to meet in Daegu in 2018. For more information see http://psi-artistic-research-working-group.blogspot.se

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If you are interested in Artistic Research Working Group, please contact the conveners, Bruce BartonJohanna Householder, and Annette Arlander

> Website PSi Artistic Research Working Group

[/x_tab][/x_tabs][/cs_column][/cs_row][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” _label=”Row 3″ style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”1/3″ type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_feature_box title=”PERFORMANCE + DESIGN” title_color=”” text_color=”” graphic=”image” graphic_size=”60px” graphic_shape=”square” graphic_color=”#ffffff” graphic_bg_color=”#2ecc71″ align_h=”center” align_v=”top” side_graphic_spacing=”20px” max_width=”none” graphic_image=”” graphic_image_alt_text=””][/x_feature_box][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”2/3″ type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_tab_nav type=”four-up” float=”top”][x_tab_nav_item title=”about” active=”true”][x_tab_nav_item title=”intention” active=”false”][x_tab_nav_item title=”events” active=”false”][x_tab_nav_item title=”contact” active=”false”][/x_tab_nav][x_tabs][x_tab active=”true”]PSi Performance+Design Working Group (PSi_P+DWG) is a global network of artists, designers, architects and theorists focusing on interdisciplinary design performativity in all its creative and discursive machinations[/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]This working group focuses on the praxis of performing design and designing performance through a global sharing of research, facilitated by coordinated events, embodied actions, ongoing discussions and discursive writing. Negotiating between performance studies and the visual/spatial/performing/culinary arts, the fluid network aims to explore theoretical underpinnings, new modes of inquiry and generative processes and practices while questioning agency around the development, fabrication, and experiencing of material, virtual, social, and political acts, environments and events.
[/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]CFP

Superflu(di)ty: a psi performance+design working group event

Design is too often considered superfluous to performances – aesthetic, technological and everyday – and yet, as sensorially orchestrated phenomena, such inventions can make discursively manifest the varying excesses of our time.  As cups’ excess runneth over, the superfluous-as-design performs its superfluidity, overflowing the edges and slipping between the cracks like water that infiltrates fissures, forcing open new spaces. In greeting this abundance with high-water boots, how are conditions of super-flui(di)ty in the social, political, environmental and/or other realms permeating our theorizing and practicing of performance design?

The psi performance+design working group seeks manifestos + manifestations to be shared at a gathering of abundant research and projects during the PSI#23 conference in Hamburg.

Presentations will be limited to 3 minutes, and may include a single image or video, physical objects or actions. These provocations will form the basis of a dialogue regarding the future of design practices in performance.

We encourage contributions from artists, architects, designers, theorists and performers.

Deadline for Submission: March 20th, 2017
Responses: April 17th, 2017

submissions should include:
• name and affiliation
• presentation title and statement (50 words maximum)
• single image
• bio (max 50 words)

Please send submissions in pdf format to Dorita Hannah (dorita.hannah@utas.edu.au) and Beth Weinstein (bmw99@u.arizona.edu) with SUPERFLUI(DI)TY and your name in the subject line.

A maximum of twelve submissions will be selected through a peer-review process.
All are welcome to attend the event during PSi.

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If you are interested in Performance + Design Working Group, please contact co-chairs Dorita Hannah and Beth Weinstein. > Website Performance+Design

[/x_tab][/x_tabs][/cs_column][/cs_row][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”rgb(195, 215, 223)” _label=”New Item 8″ style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_feature_box title=”PERFORMANCE & SCIENCE” title_color=”” text_color=”” graphic=”image” graphic_size=”60px” graphic_shape=”square” graphic_color=”#ffffff” graphic_bg_color=”#2ecc71″ align_h=”center” align_v=”top” side_graphic_spacing=”20px” max_width=”none” graphic_image=”” graphic_image_alt_text=””][/x_feature_box][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_tab_nav type=”three-up” float=”top”][x_tab_nav_item title=”about” active=”true”][x_tab_nav_item title=”Invitation” active=”false”][x_tab_nav_item title=”contact” active=”false”][/x_tab_nav][x_tabs][x_tab active=”true”]This working group brings together scholars and artists with an interest in collaborations between performance (academic studies and practice) and science.

Big players in the field of science like CERN and NASA invest in collaborations with performance makers. Joint research projects demonstrate the potential of science-performance collaborations in a diversity of fields, including medicine, cognition, and robotics. Performance presents a key to understanding scientific research and practices of knowledge production past and present, while expanded notions of performativity, like McKenzie’s technoperformance and Barad’s posthuman performativity, afford new, situated, embodied, environmental and post-anthropocentric approaches to questions and issues of concern to both science and performance. These potentials and possibilities are the subject of the working group Performance & Science. Please join us if you would like to share your work in this area and learn more about the work others are doing.
[/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]Invitation to attend the Performance & Science Working Group, PSi Hamburg.

Dear colleagues,

The working group Performance & Science brings together scholars and artists with an interest in collaborations between performance (academic studies and practice) and science to build a network, share work in progress, and explore common interests and possibilities for collaborations. In preparation for our meeting in Hamburg we invite those interested in participating to contact us beforehand so that we can circulate materials about existing projects, experiences and research prior to the meeting.

We are not asking for you to prepare a paper or any other kind of research presentation. Instead, we are planning to facilitate a conversation with the aim of identifying important thematic, theoretical, pedagogical and artistic practices that should considered by the group. We are also seeking suggestions about selections of key readings and citations from the field to be shared in advance of the meeting.

In Hamburg we are hoping undertake a collective mapping of the field and explore questions such as:
• What are the existing interactions between science and performance?
• How are performance and science collaborations organized and what are their outcomes?
• What possibilities do expanded notions of performativity, like McKenzie’s technoperformance and Barad’s posthuman performativity, afford the field?
• What are the examples of best practices to pedagogy in this area and why?
• What practices are members of the working group invested in or interested in developing through collaboration?

Please let us know if you would like to attend and do contact us with any questions or recommendations of key readings that we can circulate to prior to the conference. If you are able to let us know of your likely participation as soon as possible we would be grateful.

Yours,

Maaike and Eddie

Maaike Bleeker is a Professor in Theatre Studies, Utrecht University. Book publications: Visuality in the Theatre. The Locus of Looking (2008); Transmission in Motion. The Technologizing of Dance (2016); Phenomenology and Performance: Traditions and Transformations (2015, with E. Nedelkopoulou and J. Foley Sherman).
m.a.bleeker@uu.nl

Eddie Paterson is a Senior Lecturer in scriptwriting for performance and new media at The University of Melbourne. Book publications: The Contemporary American Monologue (2015); Redactor (2017).
eddiep@unimelb.edu.au
[/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]If you are interested in Performance & Science Working Group, please contact chairs Maaike Bleeker and Eddie Paterson.[/x_tab][/x_tabs][/cs_column][/cs_row][cs_row inner_container=”true” marginless_columns=”false” bg_color=”hsl(0, 0%, 100%)” _label=”Copy of Copy of Row 1″ style=”margin: 0px auto;padding: 0px;”][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”1/3″ type=”1/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_feature_box title=”PERFORMANCE AND PEDAGOGY” title_color=”” text_color=”” graphic=”image” graphic_size=”60px” graphic_shape=”square” graphic_color=”#ffffff” graphic_bg_color=”#2ecc71″ align_h=”center” align_v=”top” side_graphic_spacing=”20px” max_width=”none” graphic_image=”” graphic_image_alt_text=””][/x_feature_box][/cs_column][cs_column fade=”false” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” fade_duration=”750″ _label=”2/3″ type=”2/3″ style=”padding: 0px;”][x_tab_nav type=”three-up” float=”top”][x_tab_nav_item title=”about” active=”true”][x_tab_nav_item title=”invitation” active=”false”][x_tab_nav_item title=”contact” active=”false”][/x_tab_nav][x_tabs][x_tab active=”true”]The new working group Performance & Pedagogy offers a forum for sharpening questions and workshopping models that arise from the PSi membership. P&P opens conversations spanning embodied being, doing and knowing across multiple dimensions of pedagogy, such as learning, teaching, and institutional contexts of delivery. Our goal is to discover and expand on urgent topics in dialogue with PSi membership across positionalities. This working group can serve as one support system through which to assess existing and imagine new topologies of P&P practices and methods.

Topics may be framed in institutional terms: How do pedagogies evolve, reflect and how can they drive education practices within cultural and economic ecologies? How can pedagogies effectively encompass responsiveness to social and political modalities? Do pedagogic models imply demands on curriculum? Where is change agency located? How are pedagogies embedded differently in cultural institutions dedicated to production and presentation? Other topics may originate in procedural observations: What are forms of feedback and critique across performance and performing arts? How do research and production methodologies impact student/teacher and student/student interaction? Whose responsibility is it to make professional ecologies transparent? How to articulate needs for improvement? Are we taking stock of practitioner knowledges and how should we track new developments around embodied exercises in teaching?[/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]The P&P working group is seeking to create an intergenerational exchange at the Rijeka convening. Embracing the conference theme “Crises of Care: Act Respond Engage”, we ask: how do we take care of each other in the academy and beyond? Through workshop and breakout formats we will think about how needs and rules are inhabited, and how power and empathy do or fail to intersect. Our goal is to jointly develop a map of relations, and use that to identify possible intersections at which care can be enacted in new ways.

In advance of the conference, we will ask you to let us know if you are interested in participating. We will then distribute a bibliography along with a list of questions, the answers to which should help us shape workshop meetings according to the needs and interests you identify. An additional goal is to jointly share an extended inquiry to inform future convenings of the group. [/x_tab][x_tab active=”false”]If you are interested in Performance & Pedagogy Working Group, please contact chairs Adelheid Mers and Rumen Rachev.

Contact emails: Adelhed Mers (amers@saic.edu) and Rumen Rachev (rrachev@aut.ac.nz).[/x_tab][/x_tabs][/cs_column][/cs_row][/cs_section][/cs_content][cs_content_seo]WORKING GROUPS
PSi Working Groups bring together individual researchers to exchange ideas about shared topics of interest. Working groups meet during the yearly conferences, and sometimes also organize additional conferences or other events in between the conferences. (Note: Working Groups need to meet at least every other year at a PSi conference in order to be considered an active PSi group.)
If you would like to propose a working group, please contact Jennifer Nikolai.
AFTER DWIGHT CONQUERGOODaboutintentioneventscontactThis group aims to support a critical praxis of socially engaged performance scholars. This praxis, to borrow Conquergood’s words, “struggles to open the space between analysis and action”. The group seeks to explore, stimulate and develop its members’ work through the sharing of practice, writing, ethical debate, collaborative research and embodied learning.
In 2016, PSi’s Dwight Conquergood Award (DCA) was in its 10th year. What does it mean to work “in the spirit of Dwight Conquergood”? This phrase shapes the criteria for how the Dwight Conquergood awardees are selected. But what is that ‘spirit’ exactly, and what critical, historical, mnemonic, affective and ethical landscapes and lineages coalesce to contour it? This working group provides a platform for exchange amongst DCA Laureates and other interested PSi members to explore ways of working together ‘after Dwight Conquergood’. The work of such scholars may be socially motivated, or take as its focus socially engaged theatre practices. However, it may also combine action and analysis through modes of ethnography, storytelling or performance practice that reflect a socially engaged methodology. We hope to provide mutual support in the areas we have in common: working with ‘disenfranchised communities’, and working across the disciplinary structures of performance and ethnography.
Working Group Call for Papers
‘After Dwight Conquergood: Performance and Critical Social Praxis’
PSi#25 – July 4-7 2019 – Calgary
The ‘After Dwight Conquergood’ working group exists to support a critical praxis of socially engaged performance scholars. This praxis, to borrow Conquergood’s words, “struggles to open the space between analysis and action” (2002: 145). The work of such scholars may be socially motivated, or take as its focus socially engaged theatre practices. It may also combine action and analysis through modes of ethnography, storytelling or performance practice that reflect a socially engaged methodology.
At PSi#25 2019 in Calgary, we will be holding a working group session (in person and via Skype/email), to share our experiences of negotiating the opportunities and difficulties of working in these ways.
We invite reflections on the idea of ‘para-academia’ and the ‘para-academic’, as a possible way of thinking through participants’ concerns, practices and hopes. This term tests the affordances of the conference’s thematic ‘elasticity’. If elasticity implies a stretching of and eventual return to a prior state or status quo, how might ‘para’ prefix an alternative relation to the norms of academic work? If elasticity implies the resilience of actors, institutions or processes to transform and yet remain intact, do ‘para-academics’ perform resilience, or instead encounter snapping points? To what extent is a para-academic relation to institutions sustainable? What counter-effects does it produce, and are these inclusive and/or lasting? Who can identify as a ‘para-academic’?
Could para-academia be like paradox(a), and provide dialogic questions or a counter-narrative? Could it be like parapluie (umbrella) and form shelter for going ‘against the flow’, under which alternative practices can huddle together? Can we act as a parasite and recuperate what we need from institutions? Or do they (and we) sometimes act parasitically on other creative practices?
We also take this opportunity to debate the name of the working group and its current association with the late US researcher Dwight Conquergood. The working group was founded in the 10th year of PSi’s Dwight Conquergood Award to reflect on the terms of that award and Conquergood’s legacy in performance studies. Is this affiliation productive – might we consider Conquergood as a para-academic, for example – or does it imply unhelpful hegemonies in centering a (US, white, male) researcher in our work?
We invite you to share a 500 word description of an experience or question you would like to discuss with the group, to be circulated in advance. The goal is to reflect together on the concrete challenges (and successes) we face, and how to think through these critically in moving forward.
Please send your documents and any relevant images to the working group co-convenors by 30th April 2019:
Prof Jazmin Badong Llana    jazmin.llana@dlsu.edu.ph
Dr Matt Yoxall               mattyoxall@yahoo.com
Dr Ella Parry-Davies             ella.parry-davies@cssd.ac.uk
Participants can be present on Skype during the working group meeting, if not in person. If this is impossible, they can reflect on other participants’ contributions via email to be circulated in advance of the meeting.Matt Yoxall (Chiang Mai University)
Jazmin Badong Llana (De La Salle University, Manila)
Ella Parry-Davies (King’s College London & National University of Singapore) COMMUNITY PERFORMANCEabouteventscontactThis group offers a meet-up and networking meeting at PSi conferences, for people interested in and engaged in community performance, community-based theatre, theatre for social change – we use a wide open definition, and mainly understand ourselves as a hosting space.
Community Performance Working Group will hold a networking session on July 5, 2018, during PSi#24 conference in Daegu, South Korea. Kanta Kochhar-Lindgren will be the host. All are welcome, introduce yourself, meet others, and enjoy each other’s company.Petra Kuppers, (University of Michigan), chair Community Performance working group.PERFORMANCE AND PHILOSOPHYaboutintentioneventscontactFounded by Laura Cull in 2008, the PSi Performance and Philosophy Group aims to encourage debate and collaboration between PSi members who have in common their engagement in philosophy as it intersects with performance. The membership is made up of international practitioners, independent scholars, postgraduates, emerging scholars and established figures – all of whom engage with the ideas of a diverse range of philosophers including: Alain Badiou, Giorgio Agamben, Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Ranciere, François Laruelle, Luce Irigaray, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Emmanuel Levinas, Jacques Derrida, Jean-François Lyotard and Michel Foucault. But for the most part, this research wants to move beyond the mere application of philosophy to performance and to explore the philosophical dimensions of performance alongside the performative dimensions of philosophy.

The working group coordinates research events and publications that allow members to examine connections between performance and philosophy. Members research the nature of the relationship between philosophy and performance in a variety of contexts, such as: the use of philosophy as a methodology in Performance Studies; performance theory and practices exploring philosophical themes; philosophers’ writings on the theatre and performance; dramatic texts by philosophers.

Members pursue research questions including, but not limited to, the following:
How might philosophy and performance relate? To what extent might performance be understood as that which puts philosophy into practice?
What are the benefits and risks of the translocation of concepts from philosophy into the study of performance? What are the values and problems of configuring an individual philosophers’ work as a methodology for the study of performance: the Deleuzian, Derridean, Foucauldian etc.? •
Can philosophy be understood as performance? Can performance be understood to be doing philosophical work?
A special issue of the journal Performance Research, “On Philosophy and Participation” was commissioned following the 2009 interim conference in Aberystwyth and was published by Routledge in December 2011.
Documentation of the groups contributions to PSi 15 in Zagreb, PSi 16 in Toronto, PSi 17 in Utrecht can be found on the working group’s own website.

As a member you will receive a regular mailing list information on the group’s forthcoming activities. You will also be invited to join the group’s website, which includes a members database.The working group tends to meet twice a year: once at the events organised by the group at the annual PSi conference and again at an interim conference specifically dedicated to performance & philosophy. So far, there have been 4 interim conferences:

– How Performance Thinks in London in April 2012
– Actor, Performer, Citizen in Helsinki in April 2011
– Performance & Philosophy in Berlin in April 2010
– Making and Thinking in Aberystwyth in January 2009

Performance Philosophy will run an open working group at PSi #22 Performance Climates in Melbourne on 5 July 2016.

Based on previous years, the working group will take the format of a brief (5-7 minute) informal intervention that outlines your approach or interest in performance philosophy with time for questions and discussion. The talk can be either theoretical or offer a practical provocation.

The group aims to provide a chance for performance scholars and performance philosophers working within different philosophical traditions to meet and make connections in their research prior to the formal opening of the conference. Participants will include, among others, Performance Philosophy co-conveners Theron Schmidt (in person) and Will Daddario (via Skype).
If you would like to join the working group, please contact the Chair, Will Daddario.

> Website Performance and Philosophy Working Group
> Performance Research, “On Philosophy and ParticipationDRAMATURGY & PERFORMANCEaboutintentioneventscontactDramaturgy and Performance Studies Working Group will broadly consider the particular situation of dramaturgy in relation to performance studies. It will open new perspectives on dramaturgy that are not considered in theatre studies contexts nor in cognate fields of research such as literary studies. Meanwhile, it will also consider how the discipline of performance studies has developed alongside and in connection with the revived interest in contemporary dramaturgical practices.
Starting our inquiries are the questions:
What are the ideas and practices connecting performance studies and dramaturgy?
Is performance studies dramaturgical and how does dramaturgy (mis)perform in applying concepts and practices essayed within the performance studies paradigm?The PSi working group on Dramaturgy and Performance will engage three broad subjects over the coming years: How we respond to the ways in which new research paradigms have expanded dramaturgy; the forms of emergent and embodied thinking that dramaturgical awareness facilitates; and the ethical dimensions of the choices that dramaturgy enables.

The working group is inclusive; when convening at a PSi conference, an open call for participation will be distributed well in advance.  This call will include a subset of discussion themes and an invitation to submit discussion prompts in the form of 1-page responses to a series of open-ended questions. The working group sessions are generally organized as a combination of 2-3 minute presentations, facilitated work in smaller groups, and feed-back/discussion in a larger group.

Please direct questions regarding this group to the convenor Pil Hansen at pil.hansen@ucalgary.caCall for Participation: PSi25 Working Group on Dramaturgy and Performance, 2019

We invite artists and scholars attending the PSi conference in 2019 to participate in our open Working Group meeting. This working group is engaging three broad subjects over a series of years: how we respond to the ways in which new research paradigms have expanded dramaturgy; the forms of emergent and embodied thinking that dramaturgical awareness facilitates; and the ethical dimensions of the choices that dramaturgy enables.
This year the group will focus on the concept of dramaturgical awareness. In addition to an open conversation about what this mode of awareness might constitute, we are interested in discussing the ways in which evolving praxes, forms of collaboration, research paradigms, and enviro-political changes expand the aspects of performance that are dramaturged or can be usefully regarded as dramaturgies. Might the types of awareness that these expanded dramaturgies bring about increase agency or decrease constraints? Might they sometimes consolidate in principles and norms and to what effect? In our meeting, we will facilitate discussion in rotating groups around themes and problems drawn from participants’ responses to these questions. Our objective is to map positions, generate possible answers, and articulate new questions.

If you would like to participate in the working group at PSi25, then please consider submitting discussion prompts and/or reflections in response to the theme of “dramaturgical awareness” and the associated questions described above. Your written response should be a maximum of 500 words in length and submitted to pil.hansen@ucalgary.ca by June 24, 2019 (include “DRAMATUGY WG” in your subject line). All contributors of written responses will be invited to offer a brief summary of their prompt/reflection at the beginning of our session.

Warm regards,

Pil Hansen (Dramaturgy and Performance working group Chair and Convenor)
Bruce Barton (Dramaturgy and Performance working group Co-Convenor, 2019)If you would like to know more about the Dramaturgy & Performance Working Group, please contact the chair Pil Hansen.PERFORMANCE IN HISTORICAL PARADIGMSaboutintentioneventscontactThe Performance in Historical Paradigms Working Group provides a dynamic forum for the discussion of performance studies methodologies for those who engage with multiple (inter)disciplinary paradigms and use performance theory to think historically, or think historically about performance.  
Questions we seek to address include:

Where does the merging of history and performance studies currently occur most productively, and where is it less so?
Are there, or should there be, any limits to the use of performance theory in historical inquiry?
What is the current state of scholarship in this “in between” space?
And how might that “in between” state change in the future?
How might performance studies expand, change, or challenge the field of history—and vice versa?
How can the methods, theoretical influences, and other disciplinary preoccupations of Performance Studies apply to the study of the past?
How do different research methodologies enable a historical perspective and what are their drawbacks?
What constitutes evidence in the intersection of performance studies and history?
How do historically-oriented scholars subject evidence of past performance to rigorous critique?
How does ephemerality, elusiveness, or transience of performance constitute problems of historical research, how do they need to be accounted for, and what are the options?

We welcome proposals to our annual workshops at the PSi conference.The Performance in Historical Paradigms Working Group provides a dynamic forum for the discussion of performance studies methodologies for those who engage with multiple (inter)disciplinary paradigms and use performance theory to think historically, or think historically about performance. This year we invite select scholars and artists to participate in our panels, shifts, and roundtable discussion. Papers and performances should be no longer than 20 minutes in length, and engage with the general working group focus on the intersections between performance studies and history. Questions we address include:

How might performance studies expand, change, or challenge the field of history — and vice versa?
Where does the merging of history and performance studies currently occur most productively?  Are there, or should there be, any limits to the use of performance theory in historical inquiry?
How can the methods, theoretical influences, and other disciplinary preoccupations of performance studies apply to the study of the past?
How do different research methodologies enable a historical perspective and what are their drawbacks?
What constitutes evidence at the intersection of performance studies and history?

The focus of the PSi 25 Elasticity conference is particularly potent for the critical investigation of the intersections of performance studies and history. In our working group, we will examine the social, political, and artistic themes of elasticity, fluidity, immigration, forced migration, assimilation, disidentification, as well as the adaptability, flexibility, and resilience of (un)desired bodies—and the limits thereof—through the interdisciplinary lens of performance studies and historiography.
We invite papers and/or performances that engage with the following questions:
+ The (Non)Elasticity of Hegemonic Narratives

What are the ways in which the elasticity of historical narratives can be used to counter hegemonic constructions?
What genealogical legacies determine the policies and practices of dominant social groups and governmental institutions that attempt to construe and homogenize local identities? How do performances expose or contest the abuse of such genealogical legacies?
In what ways do historical narratives and legacies substantiate forms of resistance and ruptures?
The use of historical evidence, including archival records, documents, and video footage, has become increasingly popular in recent performances. Such historical traces promise authenticity and accuracy in the purportedly fictitious world of the performance. What are the structures of feeling in contemporary society and scholarship that might cause such anxiety over desire for an authentic experience of the historical past?

+ Elastical Theories

The emergence of influential critical frameworks such as Marxism, postcolonialism, decoloniality, gender and queer studies, critical indigenous studies—theories developed for the empowerment of marginalized communities and transient subcultures—led to an unprecedented intertwine between scholarship and activism. How does the elasticity of such discursive and analytical practices allow scholars and practitioners to reimagine their work outside of the conventional binary of theory and praxis?
If the discursive elasticity of the field of performance studies is—in part—a result of the increased versatility and fluidity of contemporary activism and practice, then—conversely—what are the ways in which theory can extend and animate the artistic and activist imagination?
How do dispersed digitalized practices of resistance allow for a more elastic political and social activism? How does the virtual appearance of strength and empowerment impact real-life potency?
Until recently, history and historiography have been considered some of the least “elastic” disciplines relying on the rigid materiality of historical records. Various interdisciplinary fields, often under the umbrella of performance studies, have contested this rigidity in intriguing ways. In what ways can the historiography of theatre and live performance allow for the emergence of historical thinking and consciousness that is more elastic?

+ Elasticity as the Ontological Condition of Migration and Exile

If elasticity is perforce the ontological condition of the migrant, how can it become a creative, productive force under these always already stretched and overextended circumstances? How can we make sense of “elasticity” in the context of migration? Is it a forced and necessary flexibility, the agential choice to continuously stretch the human experience, or the non-agential ‘being stretched’ as a condition of the migrant?
What are the quotidian experiences and embodied practices of migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers and how do they shape and are—in turn—shaped by their transactions with the nation-state?
How do intersectional identifications (e.g. race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, class) and the performance of identities in diaspora construe different immigrant experiences?
How do the master narratives of globalization and transnationalization affect local immigrant communities?
What are the political and aesthetic interventions to the current refugee crisis undertaken by artists, scholars, human rights activists, and others? Are there historical antecedents that might inform current activism?
What are the ideological and material conditions of the reception of displaced persons—from performances of hospitality to the spatial practices of the carceral state such refugee camps and detention centers?
How do technology and the cyberspace construe (and transform) activism and performances of resistance?
What theoretical and methodological contributions might the nexus of history and performance studies offer to the ongoing debate on immigration?

To apply, please submit paper or performance abstracts directly to the working group conveners: Dominika Laster dominika.laster@gmail.com and Aniko Szucs aszucs@haverford.edu by January 15, 2019.  Proposals should include your name, institutional affiliation, e-mail address, phone number, technical requirements for your presentation (PC, projector, DVD player, internet access), a title and 250-word abstract, as well as a 150-word bio.The chairs of the Performance in Historical Paradigms Working Group are Aniko Szucs (NYU) and Dominika Laster (University of New Mexico).ARTISTIC RESEARCHaboutintentioneventscontactA primary concern of the Artistic Research Working Group (ARWG) is to encourage and expand artist participation on the ground in PSi and to expand and integrate a spectrum of discourse strategies into the PSi environment. During several years now ARWG has hosted a space and situation called the Porous Studio during the annual conference in order to invite, include, and engage artists from the neighboring region in addition to members of the Working Group to share their artistic research processes.Among Artistic Research’s primary characteristics is its potential to expand traditional epistemological frameworks for the discovery, creation, and dissemination of knowledge and experience. Artistic Research provides rich and robust contexts for investigations of both tangible events and the affective ambience that they generate. Thus the Porous Studio is designed to realize a productive laboratory of experimentation at the permeable borders of theory, philosophy, pedagogy, practice and research—one that underscores the notion of annual continuity and the practical/symbolic significance of studio/site/process at the PSi conferences. We are a constantly mutating social network of artists, which over successive years maps itself onto sites in different cities, countries and continents.Porousness thus indicates both an opening of the traditionally private domain of the artist’s studio to the public nature of performance research and practice, and a determination to engage with local artist-researchers to explore the specificities of performance in the region.ARWG is going to meet in Daegu in 2018. For more information see http://psi-artistic-research-working-group.blogspot.seIf you are interested in Artistic Research Working Group, please contact the conveners, Bruce Barton, Johanna Householder, and Annette Arlander> Website PSi Artistic Research Working GroupPERFORMANCE + DESIGNaboutintentioneventscontactPSi Performance+Design Working Group (PSi_P+DWG) is a global network of artists, designers, architects and theorists focusing on interdisciplinary design performativity in all its creative and discursive machinationsThis working group focuses on the praxis of performing design and designing performance through a global sharing of research, facilitated by coordinated events, embodied actions, ongoing discussions and discursive writing. Negotiating between performance studies and the visual/spatial/performing/culinary arts, the fluid network aims to explore theoretical underpinnings, new modes of inquiry and generative processes and practices while questioning agency around the development, fabrication, and experiencing of material, virtual, social, and political acts, environments and events.
CFP

Superflu(di)ty: a psi performance+design working group event

Design is too often considered superfluous to performances – aesthetic, technological and everyday – and yet, as sensorially orchestrated phenomena, such inventions can make discursively manifest the varying excesses of our time.  As cups’ excess runneth over, the superfluous-as-design performs its superfluidity, overflowing the edges and slipping between the cracks like water that infiltrates fissures, forcing open new spaces. In greeting this abundance with high-water boots, how are conditions of super-flui(di)ty in the social, political, environmental and/or other realms permeating our theorizing and practicing of performance design?

The psi performance+design working group seeks manifestos + manifestations to be shared at a gathering of abundant research and projects during the PSI#23 conference in Hamburg.

Presentations will be limited to 3 minutes, and may include a single image or video, physical objects or actions. These provocations will form the basis of a dialogue regarding the future of design practices in performance.

We encourage contributions from artists, architects, designers, theorists and performers.

Deadline for Submission: March 20th, 2017
Responses: April 17th, 2017

submissions should include:
• name and affiliation
• presentation title and statement (50 words maximum)
• single image
• bio (max 50 words)

Please send submissions in pdf format to Dorita Hannah (dorita.hannah@utas.edu.au) and Beth Weinstein (bmw99@u.arizona.edu) with SUPERFLUI(DI)TY and your name in the subject line.

A maximum of twelve submissions will be selected through a peer-review process.
All are welcome to attend the event during PSi.

If you are interested in Performance + Design Working Group, please contact co-chairs Dorita Hannah and Beth Weinstein. > Website Performance+DesignPERFORMANCE & SCIENCEaboutInvitationcontactThis working group brings together scholars and artists with an interest in collaborations between performance (academic studies and practice) and science.

Big players in the field of science like CERN and NASA invest in collaborations with performance makers. Joint research projects demonstrate the potential of science-performance collaborations in a diversity of fields, including medicine, cognition, and robotics. Performance presents a key to understanding scientific research and practices of knowledge production past and present, while expanded notions of performativity, like McKenzie’s technoperformance and Barad’s posthuman performativity, afford new, situated, embodied, environmental and post-anthropocentric approaches to questions and issues of concern to both science and performance. These potentials and possibilities are the subject of the working group Performance & Science. Please join us if you would like to share your work in this area and learn more about the work others are doing.
Invitation to attend the Performance & Science Working Group, PSi Hamburg.

Dear colleagues,

The working group Performance & Science brings together scholars and artists with an interest in collaborations between performance (academic studies and practice) and science to build a network, share work in progress, and explore common interests and possibilities for collaborations. In preparation for our meeting in Hamburg we invite those interested in participating to contact us beforehand so that we can circulate materials about existing projects, experiences and research prior to the meeting.

We are not asking for you to prepare a paper or any other kind of research presentation. Instead, we are planning to facilitate a conversation with the aim of identifying important thematic, theoretical, pedagogical and artistic practices that should considered by the group. We are also seeking suggestions about selections of key readings and citations from the field to be shared in advance of the meeting.

In Hamburg we are hoping undertake a collective mapping of the field and explore questions such as:
• What are the existing interactions between science and performance?
• How are performance and science collaborations organized and what are their outcomes?
• What possibilities do expanded notions of performativity, like McKenzie’s technoperformance and Barad’s posthuman performativity, afford the field?
• What are the examples of best practices to pedagogy in this area and why?
• What practices are members of the working group invested in or interested in developing through collaboration?

Please let us know if you would like to attend and do contact us with any questions or recommendations of key readings that we can circulate to prior to the conference. If you are able to let us know of your likely participation as soon as possible we would be grateful.

Yours,

Maaike and Eddie

Maaike Bleeker is a Professor in Theatre Studies, Utrecht University. Book publications: Visuality in the Theatre. The Locus of Looking (2008); Transmission in Motion. The Technologizing of Dance (2016); Phenomenology and Performance: Traditions and Transformations (2015, with E. Nedelkopoulou and J. Foley Sherman).
m.a.bleeker@uu.nl

Eddie Paterson is a Senior Lecturer in scriptwriting for performance and new media at The University of Melbourne. Book publications: The Contemporary American Monologue (2015); Redactor (2017).
eddiep@unimelb.edu.au
If you are interested in Performance & Science Working Group, please contact chairs Maaike Bleeker and Eddie Paterson.PERFORMANCE AND PEDAGOGYaboutinvitationcontactThe new working group Performance & Pedagogy offers a forum for sharpening questions and workshopping models that arise from the PSi membership. P&P opens conversations spanning embodied being, doing and knowing across multiple dimensions of pedagogy, such as learning, teaching, and institutional contexts of delivery. Our goal is to discover and expand on urgent topics in dialogue with PSi membership across positionalities. This working group can serve as one support system through which to assess existing and imagine new topologies of P&P practices and methods.

Topics may be framed in institutional terms: How do pedagogies evolve, reflect and how can they drive education practices within cultural and economic ecologies? How can pedagogies effectively encompass responsiveness to social and political modalities? Do pedagogic models imply demands on curriculum? Where is change agency located? How are pedagogies embedded differently in cultural institutions dedicated to production and presentation? Other topics may originate in procedural observations: What are forms of feedback and critique across performance and performing arts? How do research and production methodologies impact student/teacher and student/student interaction? Whose responsibility is it to make professional ecologies transparent? How to articulate needs for improvement? Are we taking stock of practitioner knowledges and how should we track new developments around embodied exercises in teaching?The P&P working group is seeking to create an intergenerational exchange at the Rijeka convening. Embracing the conference theme “Crises of Care: Act Respond Engage”, we ask: how do we take care of each other in the academy and beyond? Through workshop and breakout formats we will think about how needs and rules are inhabited, and how power and empathy do or fail to intersect. Our goal is to jointly develop a map of relations, and use that to identify possible intersections at which care can be enacted in new ways.

In advance of the conference, we will ask you to let us know if you are interested in participating. We will then distribute a bibliography along with a list of questions, the answers to which should help us shape workshop meetings according to the needs and interests you identify. An additional goal is to jointly share an extended inquiry to inform future convenings of the group. If you are interested in Performance & Pedagogy Working Group, please contact chairs Adelheid Mers and Rumen Rachev.

Contact emails: Adelhed Mers (amers@saic.edu) and Rumen Rachev (rrachev@aut.ac.nz).[/cs_content_seo]